You’re at the beach, watching the birds fly calmly through the breeze, feeling the sun on your sunscreen-protected face. You decide to go for a swim, but as you wander through the sand to the water’s edge, you notice a few beached jellyfish lying near the waterline. You start to wonder about how to stay safe when jellyfish are in the water.

We’ve got you covered. If you notice jellyfish on the beach or see them in the water—their presence is more likely during late summer and early fall—remember the following:

Don’t touch the jellyfish Even dying jellyfish or their tentacles can sting you.

Be aware in the water A presence of beached jellyfish can indicate a presence of jellyfish in the water.

Visit the lifeguard or talk with a Divemaster To learn more about the safety of the water, the presence of jellyfish, and jellyfish sting safety, talk to the lifeguard or other beach personnel. Moon jellies are usually just a little annoying. Man-o-wars can be a lot worse!

If you do get stung—it’s okay, it happens to the best of us!—stay calm.

You will probably notice the sting right away. It might feel like a prickle, needle poke, or a bee sting.

Most jellyfish are not deadly, but some—like the box jellyfish—are highly dangerous, and some people can experience allergic reactions to other jellyfish stings. Err on the side of safety and call 911 if you’re reacting badly.

If you’re confident that all you need is self-treatment, remember to observe the following protocol:

Rinse the affected area with saltwater Avoid rinsing with fresh water, as this will likely cause the pain to worsen.

Treat the affected area with vinegar if available  Rinse the affected area with vinegar for at least 30 seconds. Do not use alcohol, ethanol, or ammonia.

Remove any remaining stingers from the affected area Use tweezers or a towel—NOT your bare hands—to remove any possibility of additional stings.

Take pain relievers or an antihistamine To relieve initial pain or swelling, try over-the-counter pain relievers and antihistamines.

Talk to a lifeguard and/or healthcare professional To learn more about the jellyfish sting, or if you have any questions to ask a professional, trained beach lifeguards or your doctor are there to help you.

Use our Sun and Sting Relief Gel For immediate and long term jellyfish sting soothing relief—also helpful for sun and other outdoor hazard relief—use our Stream2Sea Sun and Sting Relief Gel.

It contains powerful enzymes and concentrated essential oils, all in our antioxidant base with organic aloe and green tea. Like all of our products, it’s safe for you and the environment, so you can get right back to your adventure!

Looking for advice from fellow adventurers? Listen to what Liza and Kat have to say!

 

 

Not only does this gel smell amazing, but it works so well. I unfortunately got stung by thimble jellies in the Bahamas last week and applied this Relief Gel and the itch never even had a chance to start. Add to that I missed a spot when sunscreening and got a bad burn on my back – applied the same Gel and it soothed, calmed, and I haven’t peeled. Bonus points for being told I smell amazing by everyone around me, despite being covered in red spots and stripes. Huge fan, works like a charm!

Kat

I am part Mermaid, and salt water runs through my veins. However, jellyfish have an unfortunate attraction to me: they LOVE me. Yesterday, I was stung quite badly by a Portuguese Man-o-war. The sting was so powerful, it felt like a puncture and the pain was immediate and severe. OUCH! Right away I immersed my foot in very hot water to neutralize the venom, which it did, but I was left with swelling and PAIN. Stream2Sea Sun and Sting Relief Gel to the RESCUE!!! I liberally applied the gel to my foot, and the relief was INSTANTANEOUS.

Liza

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